Posts Tagged ‘filing deadlines’

International Patent Filings

Posted on May 24, 2012 by

Vintage globe

There are well over 140 countries in which you could file patents!

A patent is only valid in the country in which it was filed. If you have a US patent and have an infringer based out of Canada, you won’t be able to stop them with your US patent. (A great example of this is in the RIM/NTP Blackberry patent infringement case – for some of the claims, RIM didn’t infringe because their servers were in Canada). However, since filing patent applications in every single country on the planet gets pretty expensive, you should understand your options for managing costs and making smart filing decisions.


The PCT application is one tool to preserve your options affordably. Over 140 countries have signed a treaty to cooperate with each other on patent filings and make it easier for their citizens to protect inventions abroad. Applications filed in accordance with the treaty are known as Patent Cooperation Treaty Applications (“PCT apps”). If you live in one of those 140 countries (which you probably do, since they include most of North and South America, most of Europe, Australia, and most of the Asias), you have one year from the date on which you file an application in your home country to file a PCT application, which gives you 18 more months to decide in which of those 140 other countries you’re going to file your application. At the time that you file an application in your home country, and even a year later, it’s often way too early to know whether the product or feature incorporating the invention is going to be successful enough to warrant international patent protection. Therefore, most companies decide to file the PCT application and preserve the option to file internationally.


At 30 months from the original filing, you have to make your final decision about where to file – no extensions. At this point, look to revenue, client base, and competitor locations to make your filing decisions. Got a huge client base in Europe, 90% of revenue coming from Singapore, an Australian investor that wants you to expand in Southeast Asia, or a big competitor in Canada? Those are all signs that you may need to invest in filing patents in those countries or regions. On the other hand, if you’re still boot-strapping the company, haven’t got much revenue anywhere outside your home country, or have an extremely country-specific technology, you might decide against making the investment. As with most patent-related decisions, look to your business objectives for guidance, consult with your attorney, and make the best decision possible given the resources available.


Frequently Asked Patent Questions

Question-Answer image
Here is a list of the most common questions clients ask me in our first meeting, with links to my posts with detailed responses:

1) Can I get a patent on software and/or business methods? Yes – but the real question is should you?

2) I’ve heard about provisional applications and non-provisional applications; what kind do I need? It depends – on how advanced development is, how soon you’ll be discussing the innovation in non-confidential settings, and how well funded your company is.

3) When do I need to file an application? Timing really does matter and the answer is often as soon as possible.

4) Is it expensive? Definitely. It also takes a number of years to get an issued patent. This means it’s extremely important to determine whether your company would benefit from investing in a patent application – before you file.


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Why Timing Matters in Patent Law

Posted on March 6, 2011 by

Chess pieces The two biggest, non-financial questions to ask yourself in deciding when you want to file your patent are 1) could you have competitors working on a similar invention and 2) when did you first tell anyone about your invention?

Every day you put off filing your patent application is another day someone else has to complicate your efforts to get a patent by filing for a patent on the same or a similar invention. That’s because the date on which you file that application plays a big role in defining what kinds of documents the Patent Office can use in rejecting your application, which ultimately impacts how broad or narrow your patent rights will be and how tough a fight you’ll have to get those rights allowed.

Even if you are convinced that no one else on the planet is working on this invention and that you won’t have to worry about prior art, you may still want to file that application sooner rather than later. As we’ve discussed before, if you make a public disclosure of your invention, you’ll have limited the amount of time you have in which to file that application.

While it’s all well and good to say that you ought to file sooner rather than later, you’ll need to balance these factors against your particular resource constraints. In some scenarios, you may be better off deferring detailed disclosures until you can raise the funds to file an application – or getting coaching from your attorney as to what not to say in your disclosures to others. Alternatively, you may need to make the business decision to gamble that what you’ve got is so innovative that no one else is going to come up with a similar invention before you can file your application. Regardless of your company’s particular situation, keeping these timing factors in mind will help you make sound decisions about your patent strategy.

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